Ukraine war: Putin arrests Russian General Roman Gavrilo

According to US intelligence, at least 7,000 Russian soldiers were killed in Ukraine, including three generals, and 21,000 wounded. The attack on Ukraine did not go as the Kremlin dictator Vladimir Putin (69) thought. Now he’s looking to blame someone – punishing them.

On Thursday, Putin reportedly arrested one of Moscow’s top military commanders: General Roman Gavrilov, deputy head of the Russian National Guard.

The arrest has not yet been officially confirmed. Russian television reports that the general has been fired.

In a speech to his government on Wednesday, Putin justified the war in Ukraine and slammed “traitors.”

“Any people, especially the Russian people, can always identify traitors and traitors and spit on them like one spits a fly in his mouth. I hope that the real and necessary self-purification of society will strengthen our country,” the Kremlin dictator said in a televised speech.

On Thursday, the Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov echoed Putin’s rhetoric justifying the attack on Ukraine. He also said that military action would help Russia to “clean up” the “traitors.” “In situations like this, many people become traitors and leave our lives of their own free will,” Peskov said Thursday.

“This is a cleansing. Others are violating the law and will be punished according to the law,” he added. “Many Russians have fled their homes since the start of the military operation three weeks ago.

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British Defense Secretary James Hippie called Putin’s words “frantic” and “very dangerous.” British newspaper “TelegraphHe said: ‘There is a frustration that leads him to consider an action that we consider too dangerous. I’m very worried about his mood and how pessimistic he can be. The developments within the Russian center of power are evidence of “real contradiction.”

The arrest of the senior general is said to be on two grounds, the British newspaper writes. “Telegraph‘: Either for leaking military information that caused casualties or’ wasting fuel ‘. The newspaper refers to Cristo Groshev, a Russian expert on the research team Bellingate.

“One thing is clear: there is no doubt that Putin felt the turmoil in this process,” Groshev wrote on Twitter. “It’s so bad, he changes horses in the middle – a big obstacle in battle.” (bw)

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