The Swiss president refused to supply Cheetah ammunition to Scholz

Abroad Arrival in Berlin

The Swiss president refused to supply Cheetah ammunition to Scholz

“You can’t ask us to break our own laws”

Swiss President Alain Perset has defended his country’s neutrality. In the discussion of arms deliveries to war zones, Perset reiterated Switzerland’s negative position. “We cannot violate our own laws,” he said.

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Switzerland sticks to its refusal to send arms and ammunition: Swiss President Alain Perset said this during a visit to Chancellor Scholz in Berlin. However, there are also debates about these rules in Switzerland.

DSwitzerland did not budge from the beginning on the ban on the transfer of war materials to Ukraine. Swiss President Alain Berset made this clear after talks with Chancellor Olaf Scholz in Berlin on Tuesday. Switzerland’s neutrality laws prohibit it from providing military support to either side in a conflict. “You can’t ask us to break our own laws,” Bersett said.

However, it remains to be seen “how one wants to be there, wants or can create,” Persett said. These discussions are also taking place in Switzerland. “It’s important that we stick to the rules and adapt them if necessary,” Persett said.

Ukraine needs Swiss Cheetah ammunition

When ordering arms, Switzerland requires guarantees that the material will not be sent to belligerents. However, Germany wants to export Swiss ammunition for the Gepard anti-aircraft tank to Ukraine from its stocks.

The government in Bern has so far rejected the exemptions, as have similar applications from Denmark and Spain. Attempts in Parliament to change the law have so far failed.

A Jeppard anti-aircraft gun tank at the Butlos military training area in Schleswig-Holstein

Source: dpa/Marcus Brandt

SPD foreign politician Michael Roth was disillusioned before Perset’s visit. This approach should be taken into account in future military cooperation, he told Editorial Network Germany.

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