Security tips for watching the phenomenon

The solar eclipse will occur on April 8. And even though we're not on the direct path here in Central Florida, you can still see it — but you'll need the proper protection. “Because of our location in central Florida, we will have about 60% to 70% coverage of the sun. So there will not be complete darkness,” said Luis Henry Quiroga, director of Florida Tech’s Ortega Observatory. The peak impact will only last about four or five minutes. It will come at about 1:45 p.m. RELATED: What will this year's solar eclipse look like from Florida? “The intensity of the ultraviolet radiation in the eclipse is much more intense than normal sunlight. “It's clear that “It's an eclipse, you get more attention.” To see the moon passing in front of the sun, you'll need to look directly at it, and for that reason, you'll need to be protected. “The retina is a layer of nerve tissue that lines the back of the eye,” Winslow said. From your eye which is responsible for your vision.” There is an ISO standard for proper protection for eclipse glasses or goggles to keep you safe. No matter how dark it is, sunglasses won. Don't cut it. Get eclipse glasses. For a list of authorized manufacturers and retailers, click here .

The solar eclipse will occur on April 8. And even though we're not on the direct path here in Central Florida, you can still see it — but you'll need the proper protection.

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“Because of our location in central Florida, we will have about 60% to 70% coverage of the sun. So there will not be total darkness,” said Luis Henry Quiroga, director of Florida Tech’s Ortega Observatory.

Peak impact will only last about four or five minutes and will come around 1:45 p.m

RELATED: What will this year's solar eclipse look like from Florida?

“The intensity of the ultraviolet radiation in an eclipse is more intense than normal sunlight. Obviously because of the eclipse, you get more attention,” said Dr. Paul Winslow, an ophthalmologist and retina specialist.

To see the moon passing in front of the sun, you'll need to look directly at it, and for that you need protection.

“You can get UV or thermal damage to the retina. The retina is a layer of nerve tissue that lines the back of your eye and is responsible for your vision,” Winslow said.

There is an ISO standard for proper protection for eclipse glasses or goggles to keep you safe.

No matter how dark it is, sunglasses won't do the trick. Get eclipse glasses.

For a list of authorized manufacturers and retailers, click here.

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