Putin's officers are lying to their soldiers

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Russia's soldiers protest being burned to death – they search for the meaning of war. They are constantly disappointed by the authorities.

Avdivka – the war is said to have ended on February 24; Maria could not believe her ears. But the wiretapping expert (pseudonym) from Ukraine got it right: “Well, there are rumors that we're going home soon, and here everything will last until February 24,” said a voice that had previously identified itself as high. Ranking Officer. The Kyiv Post A phone call between two Russian soldiers was intercepted and the sentence was spoken.

A quiet rebellion is growing louder among Vladimir Putin's troops in the war-torn Ukraine. In a recorded phone call from… Kyiv Post The soldier complained that he and his comrades were sent on a suicide mission by their commanders, who later arrested him for reporting the incident. In a conversation released by Ukraine's Directorate of Military Intelligence (HUR), the man tells his friend Sanya that his company was caught in the middle of Ukrainian fire because it lacked the artillery it needed to counterattack.

Machine Guns and Mortars: Trapped Russian Soldiers

“On one side of the quarry, machine guns; On the other hand, drones and two damn motors. Ukrainians started attacking us from both sides. They totally kicked our asses. Incessant fire from all sides; We run back and forth like idiots. No one knows where to go. It's an absolute disaster” – a recording of a phone call from a Russian infantryman Kyiv Post Shocking already. But the unknown soldier tells his comrade Sanya something even more important.

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Doubts about the mission: While Russian military casualties continue to grow indefinitely, Russian soldiers are asking more and more openly in private conversations about the meaning of their role in the war in Ukraine. © IMAGO/Alexander Reka

The soldier turned to his battalion commander and asked who was responsible for the criminal order and why they were denied permission to recover the bodies of their fallen comrades near Avdivka – which eventually led to his arrest for days. ; However, it was the army commander who expressed his doubts that the war would end soon; This is already a criminal offense in the Russian military. Violation or failure to comply with orders is now punishable by ten to 15 years in prison.

Putin's death toll: Ukraine expects nearly 400,000 Russian soldiers to die

Marcus Reisner Journal has the Russia dilemma Serious ANALYZED: A strong infantry force was essential to accompany and protect the advancing mechanized forces. This applies particularly to the intense urban fighting in Mariupol, Popazna, Maringa and Bagmut. The Russian Armed Forces are trying to overcome this challenge by continuously introducing demobilized soldiers. Against the current weakness of the Russian defense, the Ukrainian side is trying to maintain the lead gained by counterattacks near Kharkiv and Kherson. Russian troops are gradually being bled to death, allowing individual soldiers to recover without this battle.

On the contrary, as the German political scientist Carlo Masala said, this is the current tactic of the Ukrainian military. Hamburger Abendblatt Now using the example of Avdiivka: “I expect the Ukrainians to give up the city of Avdiivka very soon by tact. Because the real purpose of holding Avdiivka so long is to destroy Russian material and as many Russian troops as possible.

Ukrainian officials now estimate that nearly 400,000 Russians have died. According to unconfirmed reports from Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu, there are up to 25 million such in Russia. By 2026, the regular army is expected to grow from about 400,000 to 1.5 million soldiers.

Beating by Russian officials: The enemy is within our own ranks

Andreas Reisch exemplifies the humanity of Russian military leadership New Zurich newspaper: “Russia treats its troops like dirt – like expendable commodities.” This gives defenders an enormous psychological boost, Reisner explains: “When it comes to motivation, President Volodymyr Zelenskiy's troops have an advantage. The war showed that. After all, the men and women in the Ukrainian army are defending their homes and the lives of their families — they know what they're fighting for.” .Experts are unanimously convinced that Russia's soldiers on the front lines have benefited little from Vladimir Putin's war aims.

Lt. Col. Christian Koppel, in the reserve at the Center for Military History and Social Sciences in Potsdam, explains this in a Bundeswehr podcast. inquired: “Unfortunately, in Russia, for example, there is still the so-called “Dedowtschina” (“rule of grandfathers”), which refers to the serious persecution of junior soldiers by senior soldiers; officers also mistreat subordinates, there is usually a violent regime and soldiers mistreat each other; corpses are allowed to obey. should.” In this context, Gobel quotes former Russian reserve officer and current author Mikhail Shishkin: “The Russian army was and remains a 'school of slaves,' in which old soldiers have practically unlimited power over new recruits,” writes Shishkin.

Despite Putin's propaganda: Russians want to end the war – on their terms

Ukraine's Military Intelligence (HUR) regularly releases clips of intercepted calls that provide a revealing and often shocking look at the conditions faced by Russian soldiers on the front lines. Many describe the destruction of entire units through pointless attacks. Some of the phone calls discuss incidents of noncombatants retreating on their own—deserting.

Artemij Vivedensky, founder of the Independent Referendum Group, says that every second Russian is now skeptical of the official message about the course of military action. Russian fieldOpposite Daily news. Generally, Vvedensky says, a certain level of fatigue sets in. For the first time, more people responded in favor of peace talks than in favor of continuing military action. “People want it to end,” Vvedensky said. However – this is not at the expense of Russia – as can be seen from the studies. Only a minority would support unconditional exemptions, the pollster says.

Other conversations reveal the discrepancy between the actual war situation and what Russian soldiers believe to be true. A wiretapped phone call between a Russian soldier and his mother suggests that soldiers are being conditioned for long-term missions, as the soldier candidly reports: “Basically they tell us, This frenzied state lasts until 26. “Russia will 'take back territories'. (Carsten Hinzmann)

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