Cloud cover forecast for the annular eclipse in 2023

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  • Saturday’s total annular solar eclipse begins in Oregon at 9:13 a.m. PDT and ends in south Texas at 12:03 p.m. CDT.
  • Texas and southern Utah could be prime viewing areas for a total annular solar eclipse.
  • Cloud cover could obstruct the view of the partial eclipse in the Midwest and East.

Saturday’s annular solar eclipse will be at least partially visible from all of the lower 48 states, but cloud cover could be an issue in some parts of the country for those who want to wear eclipse glasses to take a look.

Here is when the annular eclipse will occur on Saturday: The so-called Ring of Fire’s path over the United States begins in Oregon at 9:13 AM PDT, or 12:13 PM EDT. It will then move southeast through parts of northeastern California, northern Nevada, southern Utah, northeastern Arizona, southwestern Colorado, New Mexico, and western and southern parts of Texas, where it will end at 12:03 PM EDT, or 1:03 PM EDT . .

The farther you are in either direction, the less you can see. NASA has an interactive map It can tell you exactly when you will see the eclipse in your location, what you expect it to look like and for how long.

(More: All the details about the annular eclipse)

The path of the total annular eclipse appears through the black band from Oregon to Texas.

Here are the conditions for areas along the path of a total annular solar eclipse: Cloud cover may obscure the sky in parts of Oregon, northern Nevada and northeastern California. There could be periods of sun and high clouds throughout New Mexico, including Albuquerque.

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On the other hand, it appears that much of Texas and southern Utah could be good locations for those who walk the full length of the trail.

The map below shows the thickness of cloud cover across the United States at 9 a.m. PDT, or 12 noon EDT, just before the eclipse begins.

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Cloud cover forecast

(The charts show the percentage of the sky that can be covered by clouds.)

Here’s what to expect in the rest of the United States for the partial annular eclipse: Cloud cover may hinder visibility across much of the Midwest and Northeast, as well as parts of the Southeast and Northwest.

Areas extending from the lower Mississippi Valley to the southern Plains, as well as southern Nevada, southern California and parts of Arizona, may be able to see a fairly clear view of the partial eclipse.

The map below shows the thickness of cloud cover across the United States at 12 PM EDT, or 1 PM EDT, just before the eclipse ends.

picture

Cloud cover forecast

(The charts show the percentage of the sky that can be covered by clouds.)

It’s really important to protect your eyes. No one should look directly at the sun, and an eclipse is no different. Experts recommend using special glasses or sights. Make sure it is from a reputable source and meets safety standards for sun viewing.

(More: What to know about eclipse glasses)

Chris Dolce He has been a senior meteorologist at Weather.com for over 10 years after starting his career with The Weather Channel in the early 2000s.

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment, and the importance of science in our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

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